Seedlings BlakBeats

Seedlings at QPAC provides opportunities to reach artists and introduce the First Nations program. Seedlings focuses on the creative development process, enabling artists and creatives the space to explore, seed new ideas, and challenge forms of expression.

BLAKBEATS

BlakBeats creates opportunities for a small collective of First Nations musicians to be in a creative development process, exploring collections, languages and giving voice to new songs.

Working with Producer Luke Peacock, the BlakBeats continued to create and collaborate over 2019-2020.

The BlakBeats for 2019 were:

Kaylah TysonKaylah Tyson

Kaylah Tyson is a Meerooni woman of the Gurang nation with ties also to the Ngugi people of the Quandamooka region. More than a hip hop artist, Kaylah completed a Diploma in Performing Arts at the Aboriginal Centre for the Performing Arts (ACPA).

Kaylah is certainly no stranger to the stage. Over the years she has performed as part of Poetic Murriz and the multi award-winning crew, Impossible Odds. Her time as a solo artist as Kaylah Truth has also seen her supporting and hosting international artists including TLC, Kid Ink, Nelly, Naughty By Nature, B.O.B, Lupe Fiasco, Ciara, J.Holiday and Lady Leshurr.

 

 

Alinta McGrady

Alinta McGrady

Ling Jay also known as Alinta, is a captivating creative who empowers the masses with her raw and energetic performance style. Having worked with various creatives in the Brisbane performing arts scene and at numerous festivals and events, she is also the other half of Duet Balairi with Benjin Maza.


Tell us about your journey into your practice? What got you started?

Song and dance has always played an important role in my life from a young age and has constantly been this force weaving through my life from a child to a teen into adulthood. It has only been in the last 4 to 5 years whilst freelancing and after finishing my studies that I have really explored and discovered my own individual practice through song and writing and performance and have taken the time to ask myself “what is it that I want to say?” and “why do I do what I do?” I think a huge part of this journey has come from learning to be comfortable and confident with who I am and wanting others ESPECIALLY women of colour, to relate and feel empowered.

How does your culture have an impact on how and why you develop work?

My culture is a part of my identity. My identity makes up my individuality. Knowing who I am at my core allows me to speak freely and to be creative. 

How important do you think the role of contemporary creatives is in continuing the tradition of storytelling? Why? 

Our roots are so deep and because of this we are going to be forever evolving, asking questions, being vocal on issues that are important to our people and all people who experience systematic oppression and are fighting for equality. These will be the stories of this generation and will be passed down to the next. This is a part of our history, just like our ancestor’s stories have been told generations before us. No matter what art form, we have and will continue to keep telling stories. It’s so vital that we keep reminding ourselves that we are important and that our stories are important as well.

 

Jhindu LawrieJhindu Lawrie

Jhindu hails from Cairns, where he grew up playing in pubs with the Medics. Treading country/folk waters with a touch of alt rock, his own songs tell stories of his experience and point of view as a young Aboriginal man growing up in an ever-changing world.


Tell us about your journey into your practice. What got you started?

I started playing music seriously in high school, in band competitions, outer school performances, even pub gigs. However, my journey didn’t originate from there. Since I was able to walk and hit pots and pans, I was taken on tour with my Dad’s band, Coloured Stone. We would go from town to town while dad would play shows. This was the very start of my journey, being immersed, surrounded by music growing up. I have since gone on to form many bands like the Medics, touring the country, playing mainstream festivals and winning some accolades.

How does your culture have an impact on how and why you develop work?

Culture is a foundation for myself when it comes to creating and anything I do. Being a part of something, knowing where you come from and the importance of family, really grounds and prepares you for anything in life. 

How important do you think the role of contemporary creatives is in continuing the tradition of storytelling? Why? 

Storytelling has always been important in my family. From listening to stories from my home land to stories of family across the desert. It is a tradition that we haven’t lost and still continues today. I believe being a contemporary indigenous artist now shapes the stories my children’s children will hear in the future. 

 

Mack Ridge

Mack Ridge

Mack Ridge is an emerging Indigenous hip hop artist based in Brisbane city. Ridge’s music has urban influences including 2Pac and Ice Cube and he is currently working on a new and exciting EP.


Tell us about your journey into your practice. What got you started?

I started off freestyle rapping in my home neighbourhood of Acacia Ridge as a young teen, though it wasn’t until last year I really decided to push my music and pursue a career as a hip hop artist.

How does your culture have an impact on how and why you develop work?

My culture is who I am as a person and I try to express that through my music. So it does play a big part in how and why I develop my work.

How important do you think the role of contemporary creatives is in continuing the tradition of storytelling? Why? 

I think it is important because as much as we have our Dreaming and Song line stories to tell, there are also modern day stories to be told of First Nations culture and history.

 

Val Flynn

Val Flynn

Meet Val Flynn, a born performer and refreshing new voice in the Australian music scene. Reminiscent of early 2000’s hip hop futuristic sounds, and exploring themes of love, sex, and individuality, Val Flynn has global ambitions to resonate with the heart beats that skip to their own sound.

Val Flynn is one of our Seedlings BlakBeat artists for 2019. The Seedling program focuses on the creative development process, enabling artists and creatives the space to explore, seed new ideas, and challenge forms of expression.


Tell us about your journey into your practice. What got you started?

I’ve been performing since I was a kid and have always just loved being on stage/in front of the camera. My love for music has really driven me to chase the dream of making pop music and all the great content that comes along with that! I just love it. 

How does your culture have an impact on how and why you develop work?

I always create music based on my emotions, experience and memories. My culture is who I am so I guess you could say it’s threaded through everything I create.

 


QPAC First Nations

Acknowledgement of Traditional Owners

We pay our respects to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander ancestors of this land, their spirits and their legacy. The foundations laid by these ancestors - our First Nations Peoples - gives strength, inspiration and courage to current and future generations, both Indigenous and non-Indigenous, towards creating a better Queensland. Queensland Government’s RAP Acknowledgment of Country